You are currently browsing the tag archive for the ‘Mosaics Reviews’ tag.

The Waterproof Bible is sitting on a dock with the lake water overflowing the dock. Be Inspired. Anywhere.You probably haven’t thought about the notion of a waterproof Bible. Unless you have activities in your life where you want to take the Word with you into the world beyond Church, you probably are thinking, “Why on earth do you need it waterproof? You going to throw it in the river?” Well, I won’t purposely, but if I fall in crossing that river with my cloth backpack, everything in it including my Bible will get soaked. For that reason, I often left it home longing for it in those quiet moments seeing God’s glory displayed in the vistas surrounding me. Or, when I was Scoutmaster along with my husband of an active, high adventure type troop, I took it to always have it handy for an opportune moment on the trail to teach, and for those Sunday “A Scout is Reverent” moments of instruction, worship, and praise only to have ti torn, soaked, stained, and unreadable after several months on the trails. I hated to see God’s Word used well, but abused in the process. Bardin and Marsee Publishing thought the same and solved the problem with The Waterproof Bible.

 

I got to test one out recently. I have to admit that it wasn’t easy to put that Bible through the paces of seeming torture. It just doesn’t sit well with me to abuse the Word of the One, true God. This was for a good cause though, proving the claims of the company, so I could tell you whether it was worth buying this product if you are an outdoorsy, adventurous type or just want a Bible you can read while in the tub. Still, it wasn’t easy. In fact, I couldn’t do it myself. My son’s fiancé, Rachel, had to take over the reins for this little project. I am quite appreciative, too. We dunked the Bible in the pool, and it floated. Phew! I am glad because I sure didn’t want to dive in that cold water of March to retrieve it. I would have seriously regretted not thinking about trying it in the tub first. We retrieved it easily as it floated to the other side of the pool. The Bible was wet, but the pages weren’t soaked at all. The water just beaded up on it and were shook off with a good fan of the pages. Of course, that isn’t even close to what I could put a Bible through on the trail, so Rachel took that Bible and ground it into mud, Georgia red clay, mud, mind you, which is the archenemy of every mother in Georgia! It is almost impossible to get rid of those stains. Whew! The Waterproof Bible came through again! We just rinsed it off, and the mud came off from the cover, the edges, and the inside pages with ease. There were none of the stains we all know so well even from a quick, dunking in the wet muds of Georgia. Coke, grape juice, milk spills later were no match for the survival skills of this Bible. All washed away with not one even dim stain or ring. Then came the ultimate test. I put the again soaked with water Bible in a dark bag for a while as a Scout would have to do on a trail and left it for a long while. I got it out in a few days, and not only was it dry, but it wasn’t mildewed or stained in any way. You can’t beat that at all!

Rachel has thrown The Waterproof Bible into the pool and is waiting to see if it floats. It does!Rachel, with my husband looking on, gives The Waterproof Bible a good rubbing in the mud inside and out. The Waterproof Bible is covered in Georgia red clay. The cover is stained with dried mud.

With the smaller, but clear, crisp font, The Waterproof Bible is just the right size to carry with you without adding a lot of extra weight or bulkiness. It truly is the perfect Bible for the trial and other outdoor activities. They have several Bible versions available: ESV-English Standard Version, KJV-King James, NIV-New International, NKJV-New King James, and NLT-New Living Translation. They have pink and blue pastel covers and a few outdoorsy camo-inspired covers, too. You also have a choice of the full Bible or just New Testament, Psalms, and Proverbs. You can also personalized the covers with names, too, for an additional fee. if you wish, or organizations cam imprint with name and/or logo also for an additional fee. Full Bibles are $44.95 and NT, Ps, and Pr. editions are $24.95. Now, my only request would be for a larger print version and even an extra large print version (for low vision readers) just so we don’t have to worry about carrying our Bibles in the rain, and yes, for reading in the tub!

After being cleaned with water and stored wet in a dark backpack for a week, The Waterproof Bible comes out dry and clean without any stains and the words of clear and readable like new.

For more information, go to the Bardin Marsee Publishing web site.

I received a copy of the above product to facilitate the writing of a frank and honest review. A positive review is not guaranteed. All opinions are my own. Your results and opinions may vary.

Advertisements

Girl Budgeting

Growing up, I liked the things it could bring when I had it evidenced by my circling toys and dog-earring pages of my much loved “Sears Wish Book” catalog each year.  If I wanted a coke, I walked from the house down the country road into the little town looking for empty glass coke bottles that I would return for money. I usually found enough to buy me a coke and occasionally enough to also get peanuts to put inside the bottle to eat as I drank my coke. If I was really lucky, I got enough empties to get a Moonpie with the coke instead. Ah, those were the simple days. I cared little for learning about money. At six, my parents got me a savings account with a small deposit. I added birthday and Christmas money to it when I got it. I received an allowance. I could save it longer term if I had something I wanted that required more than a few allowances. At sixteen, my parents opened a checking account for me. I received $100.00 per month then to buy gas for the old family car that I now drove and buy whatever I needed. I learned the ways of checking accounts, budgets, and such the hard way. Saving, though, didn’t come quickly. I was well into my adult years and had a family of my own, struggling, before I took that seriously. I believe many children may be like me, though. School never covered these topics, even economics. A little help might have gone a long way. Recently, FamilyMint sent me a simple, but thorough course to review. Let me tell you about it.

The FamilyMint Money Management Certification program is a work book program ideally suited for students  in grades 5 and up. Children from age 6-14 with parental involvement can benefit, though. The booklet is about fifty-seven pages long including printable pages of checks, deposit slips, check registers, budget planning forms, and exercise assignments. The booklet can be used as a stand-alone product or with their online software which provides a simulation of the more modern way to do your banking tasks, web banking. After instructions on how to use the course, there are four chapters on Tracking Your Money, Goal Setting, Budgeting, and Interest-Growing $. There are topic related exercises in each chapter with an overall, learning summary at the end which is a short essay form to allow the student to describe in their own words what they have learned throughout the course. Though filled with vocabulary and concept type questions to aid comprehension assessment, the assignments are actually more project-based allowing the student to set up a virtual bank account (either on paper or online through the web banking simulation) to practice hands-on the elements of financial literacy. The student begins by making a deposit and listing it on the General Savings Tracking Worksheet which can be copied from the book or printed from or kept on-line, and then start keeping a record of all money coming in and going out. This begins the process of discovering how the student uses money and begins thinking about the best ways to manage money.

The chapters include clear, concise explanation of concepts and a vocabulary list. The lists of vocabulary are in sidebars on the pages that use those words. Throughout the reading, the vocabulary words are found in bold print to draw attention to how the vocabulary words are used in context. You have definition and context use within close proximity to enhance comprehension without breaking the flow to go back to a main list of definitions. There are also “Fun Money Fact” boxes throughout the chapter giving extra, tidbits of information that interesting to remember. The chapters end with exercises designed to give the students hands-on practice over the chapter’s objectives.

I love the fact that the material is not overwhelming, but still covers all of the essentials of good money management. Also, the pace can easily be set by the student, and the parent can decide when the material is mastered by observing the performance progress. I also loved the ways that the author explained interest. The student could easily relate and see the concept, especially if they actually do the activity the illustration describes. Now, the program might could cover more topics, but for the age range, it covers the essentials and does it pretty well for most students. Parental involvement, which they encourage, will help others ease into the material.

Unfortunately, being Deaf and blind, I can’t review the web site, though I was given access, because the site uses Adobe Flash which is totally unaccessible to a braille display and screen reader. I will have to leave that part of the review to others on the Mosaics Review Team. I hope the developers will look into ways of making their site accessible in the near future.

As far as the text-based curriculum, I had to scan it in with optical character recognition software to reduce it to a text document that would allow me to read it in braille. That isn’t easy because that doesn’t always work overly well even with the best of copies. There are usually mistakes that I may or may not be able to figure out by myself. Hopefully, the program can be provided to Bookshare.org, so that organization can provide it to blind and dyslexic students in various formats. As far as the checks and deposit slip templates, they can be used with check writing guides or even made tactile enough with wax pencils are puffy paint lines. The other forms like check registers and tracking logs and goal sheets can be recreated in a text file in a more understandable format for the blind and DeafBlind. Hearing blind can usually use talking software like Money Talks from American Printing House for the Blind. We have been using the program with an older Special Needs student with developmental delays with great success. The key, of course, is parent involvement. A parent who is also teacher knows what their child can grasp and how to best present it to them for best reception. The Family Mint Money Management Certification program covers the essentials in a clear way which should give the parents the tools they need to teach these financial essentials to most students capable of using the daily services of a bank and preparing financially for the future.

The program has several pricing options that make it affordable. If you don’t wish to use the internet, then purchase only the workbook. Normally, the subscription service for the online software is $24.99 per year or $4.95 per month which allows multiple student accounts. However, you can not purchase the workbook and get the premium upgrade for a lifetime subscription to the online software usable by multiple students for $29.99. If you wish to try the online program first to see if it suits your needs, you can get a 14 day trial subscription for free. There are some features of the paid version that you will not have access to with the free trial, but the trial does give you access to the basics needed. You can also order additional workbooks, if needed, for 50% off. The program, written by MBAs has won numerous awards. After using the program, I feel I can completely recommend it for teaching the appreciation of money and financial planning.

To check it out further, go to http://www.familymint.com.

 531638_537055539659303_253663137_n

pastedGraphic.pdf

Enter your email address to follow this blog and receive notifications of new posts by email.

Join 524 other followers

Homeschool Mosaics Writers Group

Affilliate- Reading Horizons At Home

ReadingHorizonsAtHome.com

Our Village is a Little Different

Our Village is a Little Different

My blog is listed on:

Pages

Blog Stats

  • 23,026 hits
Advertisements
%d bloggers like this: